VideoElephant logo x

Stanford researchers generate hydrogen fuel from seawater

  • Category science technology
  • Definition HD
  • Resolution 1280 x 720
  • Duration 00:01:08
  • Year 2019
  • Language English

Stanford researchers generate hydrogen fuel from seawater

Stanford researchers have developed a water-splitting system that can produce clean hydrogen fuel using saltwater.According to a Stanford University press release, hydrogen fuel can be generated via electrolysis, which splits water into hydrogen and oxygen using electricity. The process typically uses fresh or purified water, as saltwater has been known to corrode.A new system developed by a team of Stanford scientists uses solar cells to power two electrodes in water, causing hydrogen gas comes out of the cathode, and oxygen to come out of the anode.To prevent corrosion from the chloride in saltwater, negatively charged nickel layers were coated on to the anode to create a barrier.Nickel foam conducts electricity, and nickel-iron hydroxide sparks electrolysis. Nickel sulfide, repels chloride and prevents it from getting to the core metal.The multi-layer device can run for more than a thousand hours, compared to just 12 without the negatively charged coating. It can also conduct 10 times more electricity and help generate hydrogen from seawater at a faster rate.According to the team, the technology have other applications beyond generating energy, such as generating breathable oxygen underwater for divers or submarines.RUNDOWN SHOWS:1. Process of electrolysis used to generate hydrogen fuel2. How the Stanford water-splitting system works3. Negatively charged nickel coating on anode to prevent corrosion4. Device can run for more than a thousand hours, conduct 10 times more electricityVOICEOVER (in English): "According to a Stanford University press release, hydrogen fuel can be generated via electrolysis, which splits water into hydrogen and oxygen using electricity.""The process typically uses fresh or purified water, as saltwater has been known to corrode.""A new system developed by a team of Stanford scientists uses solar cells to power two electrodes in water, causing hydrogen gas comes out of the cathode, and oxygen to come out of the anode.""To prevent corrosion from the chloride in saltwater, negatively charged nickel layers were coated on to the anode to create a barrier.""Nickel foam conducts electricity, and nickel-iron hydroxide sparks electrolysis. Nickel sulfide, repels chloride and prevents it from getting to the core metal.""The multi-layer device can run for more than a thousand hours, compared to just 12 without the negatively charged coating. It can also conduct 10 times more electricity and help generate hydrogen from seawater at a faster rate."SOURCES: Stanford University, PNAShttps://news.stanford.edu/press-releases/2019/03/18/new-way-generateen-fuel-seawater/https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/03/12/1900556116

Interested in this content?